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Your activity contributions go a long way!

Movecoach understands employees move in all different ways. Below we've worked with your employer and the NHS to even the playing field, and give cyclists, yogis and walkers the same chance to earn wellness points for your movement.

*All points are rewarded on a monthly basis, based on the criteria below.

How to earn points by logging activity:

Per week = 20 points

  • Complete 3 workouts per week (yoga, cross train, classes)
  • Complete 3 mindfulness sessions
  • Cycle 75 miles (120 KM)
  • Step 21 miles (34 KM)
  • Run 21 miles (34 KM)
  • Walk 21 miles (34 KM)
  • Swim 5 miles (8 KM)

LinkedIn Movecoach Milestones = 100 - 500 points

Linkedin-milestone-points-image

Log a result from an organized RACE = 150 - 1000 points

  • <5K = 150 points
  • 10K-20K = 175 points
  • Half marathon (21.1K Distance) = 250 points
  • Marathon (42K distance)/ half ironman = 500 points
  • Ultra Marathon (50K Distance)/ Ironman = 1000 points

FAQ:

1) Can I earn more than 20 points per week and/or more than 125 points per week?

You can only earn points for one physical activity per week. This is a great time to consider mindfulness to bump up your points earnings. 

For example, if you workout more than 3x, cycle more than 75 miles, and meditate 3x all within a week, you've earned a total of 40 points per week. 20 points for logging 3 workouts and 20 points for meditating 3 times per week.

2) Can I earn 100 points for hitting the first running milestone and an additional 100 for hitting the first workouts milestone?

No, you can only earn points for one physical activity milestone at a time.

For example, if you step 100 miles you will receive 100 points and you will no longer be able to receive 100 points for any other activities such as running/swimming/etc.



What are you up to?

Right now, I remain focused on my life’s professional work = helping runners of all levels train right and reach their potential.  I’m super excited about some of the great enhancements at Runcoach we will introduce to our runners this year.

What are you reading?

Gabor Mate’s The Myth of Normal. Full disclosure I’m a terrible reader and usually put books down about 60% of the way through.  Dr. Mate’s book fascinates me.  I had no concept of inter-generational trauma and the impacts.  Further, it has practical advice on how to move forward and become inherently present.  Up until now I only had running:rolling_on_the_floor_laughing:coach_tom
What are you listening to?

I’m a lyrics junkie so I like to delve into the words.  Mostly I still listen to pop, rap and of course the classics.  Taylor Swift is probably my favorite and I’m fascinated by Kanye the artist and his stories.  Recently, I was reacquainted with my college favorite Abbey Road which I still believe is the best album ever.

What are your non-running goals for 2024?

I want to read more.  I’m excited for my last season of coaching the OLA middle school track program and want to pass the reigns to the new coaches who are terrific.  I will take my first European trip to Spain in March to visit my brother, sister-in-law and niece = can’t wait!

Ok, but what about running?

I’m just coming off a ski accident and subsequent concussion so just getting back into it.  Still I’m hopeful to run the KP Half Marathon on February 4 in San Francisco.  I have a special athlete I’m hoping to pace to her first half marathon finish (you may here more about that in the future).


Fueling for your First Marathonhydrate

So you're up for a big marathon and have been checking all the boxes. You are logging tons of miles, nailing all your workouts, and even have your race day kit and shoes picked out weeks in advance. But, have you considered your marathon fueling strategy yet?

One of the most commonly overlooked aspects of marathon racing, is mid-race fueling.  You body will endure a great deal of stress and will require carbohydrates and fluids to stay strong all the way to the finish line. The chances of hitting that "wall" are much less if you have been getting in a steady stream of calories and fluids throughout the race- But where should you begin?

Research shows that the body is able to process 40-60 grams of carbohydrates per hour during exercise. While it would be fantastic for everyone to have their own personal bottles out on the course, just like the elites, this is not possible. So…what do instead? I recommend taking water every 5k, about 6-10 ounces, and a bit more if racing in hot conditions. A trick I learned is to squeeze the cups at the top to get the most out of each.  In addition to water, I recommend taking a gel every 5k as well.  Gels contain about 20 grams of carbohydrates and are easy to stash in shorts, sports bras, and pockets. Gels, combined with water, are a great option to help keep you hydrated and fueled all the way to the finish.

If the idea of taking gels is not appealing to you, I recommend checking out the race website to see what sport drink will be offered out on the course. You can purchase this ahead of time and practice using it during your long runs to make sure everything sits right. Which brings me to the most important aspect of mid-race fueling, practicing your strategy ahead of time.

It’s important to practice using gels and fluids during your long runs and workouts to make sure your stomach is able to tolerate the calories. Your body will get better and better at processing mid-run fuel so nailing down a strategy early on in your build up is key. Without practicing ahead of time, you run the risk of experiencing mid-race GI distress-something no runner wants to deal with!

So hit your local running store and give a few different gel brands/flavors a try to see which one you’ll want on race day. You can also pick up many commonly used sport drinks at these stores as well. Practice your fueling strategy early on in your build up and often, then go check that final box! Happy Running!

Updated by Cally Macumber 1.26.24



Breaking Barriers: Completing a Full Marathon - The interviewee reflects on a significant achievement.

Major milestone:

I finished my first full marathon in January 2024 thanks to the dedicated guidance from Runcoach and Coach Tom.

What is the secret to your success?

Mental resilience and running economy build up.Success_Story_January_

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it?

Inconsistent training. Training adjustments to reach sufficient aerobic fitness.

What is the most rewarding part of training?

Happiness.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community?

Dedicated and personalized coaching to personalize your running training experience. Hence, stay responsive and stick to the training plan.

Anything else you would like to share?

I appreciate Coach Tom's guidance and will be a lifetime mentee.



Runners love outdoor miles, but there are times when weather conditions may force you inside. During these moments, your training does not need to be derailed! Indoor workouts can be a powerful tool to enhance your running performance, offering a chance to focus on strength, flexibility, and cross-training. Explore the following variety of indoor workouts, ensuring you stay on track with your goals:

  1. Yoga is an awesome complement to running. It helps improve balance, flexibility, and mental toughness. You can incorporate yoga to improve your range of motion, enhance flexibility, and prevent injuries. Poses like Downward Dog, Warrior series, and Pigeon pose target areas commonly stressed during running. Dedicate a few sessions a week to yoga to enjoy its full benefits. Tune in here for a great workout!

  1. Strength training helps prevent injuries and improves running efficiency. Focus on exercises that target major muscle groups, including squats, lunges, deadlifts, and core. Incorporating resistance training with weights or bands can improve strength and stability, contributing to better performance on the road.  We recommend this workout (which requires no weights or equipment) 2 times a week! 

  1. Treadmill workouts become a valuable asset when weather conditions make outdoor running challenging. Mimic your scheduled workout on the treadmill, but place it at 1% incline and use this chart to adjust your paces.

  1. Plyometric exercises focus on explosive movements to enhance your power and agility. Plyometrics engage fast-twitch muscle fibers, important for running fast. For example, these exercises can be done in a basement or garage! Include plyometrics into your routine and take your running performance to new heights.

  1. Indoor cycling or Swimming are great ways to build cardiovascular fitness without the impact on your joints. Whether you use a stationary bike, join a virtual cycling class, or swim in the pool, these low-impact workouts allow you to maintain or improve your aerobic fitness. We suggest biking 3 miles for every 1 mile run prescribed within your plan, or swimming for equal time to run time.

Whether you're facing difficult weather conditions or simply seeking a change in routine, these indoor workouts will keep you engaged and motivated on your journey to becoming a more resilient runner.



Running with Joy: Unveiling Marathon Success with Runcoach

Major Milestone? The Marathon Runcoach_Success_Story_Lorea

What is the secret to your success?

Having fun, actually enjoying the runs.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it?

Planning adequately to get the time in and considering travel, so needing to be flexible.

What is the most rewarding part of training?

Being outside in nature, watching the trees change, learning to identify a few, listening to my body and thoughts.

What feedback would you offer on the Runcoach experience?

I did not download the app until the end of September because I thought if I only put in weekly miles I would be okay. But a friend who has run several marathons advised me to buy it. It was a game changer! I now had a plan, it even included rest, timed runs were great and it gave me confidence to know I was doing the right thing. Being able to email the coaches (Cally for me) was great. I asked her several questions, she always answered on time and I felt someone had my back. It made me feel accompanied. The daily tips were also great. Specially the reminders to “not do anything new on race day!” because it is so easy when one is nervous to want to change things up, but I stuck to the plan and it worked. I did go out too fast, I couldn’t help it, but fortunately because I was well trained I was able to keep going. Great experience.



Striking the Right Balance: A Runner's Secret to Marathon Success

Major Milestone? 

Completing Dublin Marathon in 3:54. This was my first marathon in 22 years, and my best time in 37 years, nearly 4 decades later.

What is the secret to your success?runcoach_success_antony_boyd

Discipline and focus, and setting realistic goals. I have learned that if there are failures along the way, there are always lessons that can be learned which can help make you a better runner going forward.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it?

It is very hard to fit the training in around family and work commitments. Sacrifices have to be made and sometimes you have to be selfish to get the me-time in. But at the end of the day, it is about finding the right balance in a realistic way. You cannot please all of the people all of the time.

What is the most rewarding part of training?

To see the improvement. To come back from a hard run at the end of the day following a really tough day at work, but knowing you have given it your best, the positive energy gained can turn any negative thoughts into a runner’s high. And you know that you are going places as you strive forward and closer to reaching your goal.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community?

Just go for it. You will not regret it. And don’t be afraid to seek help from those around you. I am in my mid fifties and am running better and feeling better with myself than I have done in decades. I have not been able to do this on my own though, and have learned to seek help from nutritionists, physios, experienced runners and a chiropractor. The whole system needs good maintenance to work properly.

Anything else you would like to share?

Mix up your training runs - include some road running and trail running. Milestone races also add some spice and excitement and allow you to benchmark your improvement over time and to engage with the local running community too. And also try to keep it interesting by mixing up the routes and throwing in some big adventures to give excitement and memories too. The mental well-being benefits are huge.

What feedback would you offer on the Runcoach experience?

The coaching advice from Cally has been first class, She was always good to respond in good time, answering all of my questions and sharing her huge experience and knowledge. Thank you Cally!



Overcoming Doubts, Achieving Milestones: An Inspiring Interview with a Dublin City Marathon Finisher

Major Milestone? 
Dublin City Marathon (Ireland)

What is the secret to your success?Dublin_Marathon_Success_Story

Listen to good advice like following the training plan, good nutrition, rest and sleep, strength exercises to reduce the risk of injury and warm up before every run. It's not one of these, it's all of them. Make this a routine. Above all, you have to want it.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it?

Worrying that I was not good enough or fit enough to run a marathon. Earlier in the training plan, this knocked my confidence. But as I achieved my sub goals I began to see the value in the plan and my confidence slowly grew. Worry has no value..stick to the plan and have patience.

What is the most rewarding part of training?

By far the most rewarding part of training was seeing my fitness level increase. A year ago, doing a 25k run was tough; now I find it relatively easy and enjoyable. My preference is longer distance running and the training plan Runcoach gave me helped me to become a confident endurance runner.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community?

Whatever your big goal is, set mini goals along the way and train for each goal. Enter competitive runs and stick to your plan as best you can. This will give you a big confidence boost as you achieve each mini goal.

Anything else you would like to share?

I started running at the age of 51 and two years later I've just completed my first marathon. It's never too late. In the marathon, I ran with with people of all ages, abilities and challenges. If you want to do it, you can.

What feedback would you offer on the Runcoach experience?

Runcoach is a terrific resource to have supporting you. There are plans to suit all stages of your progress including weekly schedules and audio guide when running. But the best part is that you get a dedicated professional coach...a real person to help you and answer questions. My coach Cally is brilliant and definitely helped my achieve my goals.



Master Marathon Pacing

Written by Cally Macumber October 26, 2023
Pacing in a marathon is like a finely tuned dance. Too fast, and you might find yourself running out of steam before the finish line. Too slow, and you might miss out on reaching your full potential. To master your marathon pacing strategy, you'll need to find the balance, the sweet spot, where you can maintain a consistent pace and finish strong. Let's explore tips to ensure a successful race day.

Start Slow to Finish Strong:

One of the most common pacing mistakes in marathon running is starting too fast. The excitement of the race and the adrenaline rush can tempt you to sprint out of the gate, but this can lead to early fatigue and negatively impact your overall performance. To avoid this, consciously start the race slightly slower than your goal pace. This conservative approach ensures you conserve precious glycogen stores for later in the race.  We like to think of mile 1 as a warmup mile where you can utilize a bit of fat for fuel, allow your body to warmup and turn the race fro 26.2 to 25.2 miles right off the bat.  We recommend the first mile be 30-45 seconds slower than goal pace to accomplish the above objectives.

Embrace Negative Splits:

While many marathoners aim for even splits (maintaining the same pace throughout the race), some runners aim for negative splits. Negative splits involve running the second half of the marathon faster than the first. This approach allows you to finish strong and provides a mental boost when you pass other runners in the late miles. There have been strong results from Marathon runners who complete negative splits inclusive Kelvin Kiptum’s recent World Record at Chicago where he ran 1 minute faster for the 2nd half of the race.

Adapt When Needed:

Flexibility is a valuable within a marathon. Unexpected obstacles, like weather conditions or muscle cramps, may require adjustments to your plan. Be prepared to adapt without panicking. Sometimes, slowing down briefly can help you recover and continue at your goal pace. Many athletes have receive a great lift when they actually stop and walk briefly (preferably through an aid station) as the quick break allows muscles a brief recovery.

Trust Your Training:

Your marathon training program was designed to prepare your body for the race. Trust in the process and the hard work you've put in during your training runs. The pace you've practiced is the pace you're ready for. By following your training plan and being consistent in your workouts, you've build the endurance necessary for a successful marathon.

Keep in mind that every marathon is a unique, so remain adaptable and embrace the journey that this specific race offers. Whether you're a beginner or a seasoned runner, pacing is a skill that can always be perfected!



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